8 Recipe Ideas for Kaya (Coconut And Pandan Spread)

The word “kaya” has two meanings in Malay - it can mean “rich” as in “wealthy”, or it can refer to a coconut and pandan jam that’s universally loved by Malaysians. Making kaya at home properly can be laborious and time-consuming - back in the old days you would cook it in a double-boiler and stand over the stove for hours stirring the coconut » Read More

12 Ways To Use Chilli Sambal And Crispy Prawn Chilli In Your Cooking

  Most of you are too young to remember, but if you lived in Australia in the 80s like I did, you’d know how hard it was to find Malaysian ingredients anywhere. That was why I had to learn how to make everything myself when I wanted to indulge in my craving for Malaysian food. Nowadays though, you should be able to see quite a few » Read More

How To Make Vegan Kaya II

This was my second attempt at a vegan version of Kaya; the first time around, I used mashed taro (=> https://jackiem.com.au/2017/02/23/make-vegan-kaya-onde-onde/ ), which basically tasted like sweetened mashed taro. Nice, but you're not fooling anyone who has any inkling of what kaya is like. This new recipe is adapted from one I found at » Read More

How To Make Vegan Acar (Spicy Pickles)

This is the same acar recipe (mixed vegetable pickle with crushed roasted peanuts and sesame seeds) that I used for my restaurant except for the omission of shrimp paste (belacan) in order to make it vegan. Please note my philosophy of "agak-agak" ie. guesstimating is in full force here, especially where the sugar is concerned, so take the amounts » Read More

How To Make Petis Udang or Hei Ko (Prawn Paste)

This prawn paste is sometimes called shrimp paste (not to be confused with belacan/terasi; I know, it's confusing), and it's best known as the base for Penang rojak aka fruit rojak, and as a topping/dip for Penang Assam Laksa. It's molassy, dark brown, sweet and pungent. In Chinese it's known as Hei Ko, and in Malay it's called Petis Udang or Otak » Read More

How to Cook Crispy Squid or Calamari

My seafood shopping choices are heavily dictated by budget, in the sense that I would pick up something simply because it looks cheap, and figure out how to make it palatable after the fact. This explains why I often use squid instead of the more expensive calamari; contrary to popular opinion, squid can taste pretty tender even when simply » Read More

How to Make Vegan Yam (Taro) Cake

This iteration of yam (taro) cake which I made during my Twitch Live Asian Kitchen broadcast did not start out being vegan, but it became so when I realised I did not have anywhere near enough dried shrimp for it. I did have some minced preserved radish, however (the stuff you use in Pad Thai, and which I use in my Chai Tow Kway or radish cake), so » Read More

How To Make Pickled Green Chillies

Pickled green chillies are a popular condiment back in Malaysia, and most commonly served as an accompaniment to hawker stall dishes like wantan mee (wonton noodles). I make this only very occasionally, since I don't often eat wonton noodles myself, and in all honesty, I don't really measure the ingredients that go into it. Nonetheless, for your » Read More

How to Make Jackie M’s XXO Sauce

I remember when XO sauce started popping up in Chinatown menus as an option for your stir-fried Chinese dishes a couple of decades ago, and thinking it must refer to cognac. I eventually learned that it was in fact a condiment made with dried scallops, an ingredient that’s expensive enough that it would deter me from ever entertaining the thought » Read More

How to Make Khmer Red Ant Beef Salad

A Wok Around Asia Recipe by Chef Chanrith Van of Courtyard by Marriott Siem Reap Resort I can legitimately say that I’ve never looked at an ant (red or otherwise) and wondered what it would taste like. Nonetheless, I wasn’t about to pass up an opportunity to try it during my visit to Siem Reap, where it was served as part of a carpaccio-like rare » Read More