How to Cook Crab with Yee Meen Noodles

Mud crab with ginger and shallots and yee meen noodles is a bit of a special occasion dish at Chinese restaurants here in Australia because of its price tag, but it's actually quite easy to achieve at home, especially if you use cheaper varieties of crab like I did here. I usually go for spanner crabs, which usually go for about 1/3 the price tag » Read More

How to Make Vegan Tropical Ice Popsicles

Vegan Tropical Ice Popsicles - A super easy recipe that even kids can attempt; I’m using coconut cream (although in the video I only had coconut milk) and natural plant extract food colouring courtesy of My Blue Tea. Watch the video here >> Vegan Ice Popsicles INGREDIENTS: 400ml coconut cream ⅓ cup shredded coconut 5-6 TBSP » Read More

How to Make Loh Mai Kai (Sticky Rice with Chicken)

Loh Mai Kai (Cantonese for sticky rice with chicken) is traditionally steamed in rice bowl-sized moulds and eaten at breakfast; in this particular version, it’s steamed in a casserole dish. I’ve omitted the Chinese wax sausage since I don’t eat pork, but you’re more than welcome to use it; you just need to steam and dice it up and add it to the » Read More

How to Make Kuih Bingka Ubi (Baked Cassava Cake)

Kuih Bingka Ubi or Baked Cassava Cake is about as simple a Malay kuih as you can make, and the bonus is that it's gluten-free. If you're based in Sydney, you should be able to find grated cassava easily in the freezer section of Indian and well-stocked Asian grocery stores - it's a definite timesaver. BTW I know I've posted this recipe on this » Read More

How to Make Cucur Badak (Stuffed Sweet Potato Dumplings)

Cucur Badak, or savoury sweet potato dumplings stuffed with a spicy minced dried prawn and coconut filling, is one of those little Malay kuih (snack) recipes that we learned in our Home Science classes back in high school in Malaysia, and they’re really not that hard to make. The fact that you need to deep-fry them is probably a bit of a » Read More

How to Make Hakka Lo Pek Pan (Hakka Radish Cake)

I sometimes feel sorry for those not born into the culture trying to learn all the nuances of Chinese food. It’s hard enough trying to wrap your head around the topic, let alone recognise all the different iterations of specific dishes by different Chinese dialect groups. Radish cake is one such example; the Cantonese version found at yum cha » Read More

How to Make Yee Chai Peng (Ear Biscuits)

Yee Chai Peng (Cantonese for “ear biscuits”) were these intriguing spiral-patterned, curved fried pastries from my childhood in Malaysia, which were crunchy, slightly sweet and yet savoury. The only ones I ever ate were factory-made; this wasn’t one of those things that you would find people making fresh at home or at their street stall - certainly » Read More

How to Flip & Cook Roti Canai | Roti Bom | Murtabak & More (Part 2)

A Wok Around Asia Roti Canai Masterclass by Traders Hotel Kuala Lumpur This is part 2 of a two-part series on how to make roti canai; part 1 (click here) covered how to make the dough, and this part shows you how to flip, fill and fold the roti. Chef Chandra of Traders Hotel Kuala Lumpur covers all the popular roti styles available at your » Read More

How to Make Savoury Taro Cake (Wu Tao Ko)

Savoury Taro Cake (Wu Tao Ko in Cantonese) was a breakfast snack that I remember being sold alongside Chee Cheong Fun (steamed rice noodle rolls) back in my hometown of Seremban in Malaysia. My parents would typically order a small share plate of it from the hawker stall at breakfast, and it was served steamed (not pan-fried like what you get at » Read More

How to Make Vegan Blue Smoothie Bowl

I generally frown on any recipe that’s tagged as “healthy” or “vegan” because my brain translates those words respectively as “fad” and “taste-free”. However, this smoothie bowl is pretty tasty in spite of being healthy and vegan, so definitely give it a try if you have some fruit sitting around at home. The coconut milk/cream bit comes into » Read More